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Category Archives: Blog Posts

GovProcure™ – critical requirements and design choices

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We built GovProcure with several basic requirements in mind. It would have to meet tough federal government standards for the security and privacy of the data it contains. It would have to be massively scalable, capable of supporting tens of thousands of users within a single organization. It would have to be highly reliable, offering better than 99.9% availability – that is, less than 10 minutes of downtime per year, on average.

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Contract Management- Lessons from the assembly line

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In some regards, the federal contracting process is much like a very complex factory assembly line.  The raw materials and inputs change with each run, but the process remains constant.  Some of the steps are serial and sequential, while others occur in parallel, with lots of moving parts and variables, but all of those steps flow toward a standardized result.  The key to keeping that assembly line moving efficiently is a well-defined process that provides the required elements on time and at the right place.

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Is the Federal Government Ready For Free Trials?

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Technology has evolved to the point where it is now possible (and easy) to trial software, or Software-as-a-Service and evaluate its usefulness before you buy.  Historically, the federal government has invested in costly and time consuming development contracts, only to find that, at times, their expensive investment doesn’t really fit the bill.

But SaaS is turning this situation on its head as agencies are now able to try it before they buy it.  So why aren’t they?

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How are we managing $500 billion in contracts? Does anybody know?

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In FY 2013, the Federal Government will spend about $500 billion on contracts with private sector firms.  This number is down somewhat over the past few years as the Obama administration has sought to consolidate contracting activities and bring back some of this work in house.  Yet $500 billion is a huge amount of spending, and indeed, the US federal government is the largest single buyer in the world.

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